U.S – Iran: Challenges Ahead

The Trump Administration has tasked Congress to revise legislation dealing with the Iran nuclear agreement and has also called on European allies to amend the deal. Can compromises between the parties be reached within the short deadline in order to keep the U.S. committed to the deal? Is there a better way to achieve America’s objectives to contain Iran without walking away from the agreement?

Global Town Hall

The Tennessee World Affairs Council And

Belmont University’s Center for International Business

In Association With The Iran Project

Invite You

Turning Point in US-Iran Relations

Career Ambassador Frank G. Wisner, US Foreign Service (Retired)

Belmont University
Vince Gill Room
Curb Event Center Concourse
February 26, 2018
Check-in/Networking – 5:30 pm
Program – 6:00 pm

Attendance is free. Registration is required.

SUGGESTED DONATION: $10.00

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“…we’ve been very clear on our policy on Iran. The prior administration focused all of the Iranian policy around the nuclear deal, the JCPOA. Our policy is much broader. We look at the totality of Iran’s actions and behaviors. So the decisions around waiving sanctions relative to the nuclear agreement and decisions to take in terms of imposing additional sanctions on Iran that are unrelated to the nuclear agreement are – there’s a broad array when you talk about sanctions.

“I think some people get confused — sometimes, and it’s understandable. But Iran’s support for the Houthis in Yemen, their support for destabilization efforts in Syria, the funding of militias, the sending of foreign fighters, arming terrorist organizations in the region, Lebanese Hizballah – that has to be dealt with. And our sanctions are targeted at Iran’s destabilizing activities within the region while still maintaining all our efforts to ensure Iran never acquires nuclear weapons.

“So there are sanctions regimes built around both of those efforts. And what the President has done with his policies, is he’s now looked at Iran in its totality and said Iran has to be held to account in both of these areas.”

US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Jan 5, 2018


Frank G. Wisner is an International Affairs Advisor at Squire Patton Boggs. A career diplomat with the personal rank of Career Ambassador, he previously served as Ambassador to India from 1994-1997. Additionally, he held the positions of Ambassador to Zambia (1979-82), Egypt (1986-91), and the Philippines (1991-1992). Mr. Wisner has served in a number of positions in the U.S. government, including Undersecretary of Defense for Policy (1993-94), Undersecretary of State for International Security Affairs (1992-93), Senior Deputy Assistant Secretary for African Affairs (1982-86), and Deputy Executive Secretary of the Department of State (1977). During the course of his career, Frank Wisner served in the Middle East and South and East Asia.

Amb Frank Wisner Discusses US-Iran (Click for Video)

Center for Strategic and International Studies “Detering Iran After the Nuclear Deal” (Click for Video)


The Iran Project continues its efforts to prevent Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons. Iran has remained in full compliance with its commitments under the nuclear deal (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action or JCPOA) since the interim agreement was signed in 2013, but new threats to the JCPOA have emerged. Although the Trump administration has not withdrawn from the agreement, the actions and threats from the Executive Branch and from Congress against Iran and the JCPOA could eventually lead to its demise.

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